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Report No. 77

7.7. Interval between arguments and judgment.-

We also wish to emphasise the importance of ensuring that the time-lag between the conclusion of arguments and the pronouncement of judgment should not be very long. Complaints are sometimes made of some judicial officers sleeping over their judgments and taking unusually long time for this purpose. This must be put an end to. It is also a mistake to suppose that judicial officers can produce better judgments by taking long time for their preparation and pronouncement.

We would in this context draw attention to the proviso appended to sub-rule (1) of rule 1 of Order XX of the Code of Civil Procedure by Act 10 of 1976, according to which,1 where the judgment is not pronounced at once, every endeavour shall be made by the court to pronounce the judgment within fifteen days from the date on which the hearing of the case was concluded but, where it is not practicable so to do, the court shall fix a future day for the pronouncement of the judgment,
and such day shall not ordinarily be a day beyond thirty days from the date on which the hearing of the case was concluded, and due notice of the day so fixed shall be given to the parties or their pleaders provided further that when a judgment is not pronounced within thirty days from the date on which the hearing of the case was concluded, the Court shall record the reasons for such delay and shall fix a future day on which the judgment will be pronounced and due notice of the day so fixed shall be given to the parties or their pleaders.

Decree

1. Order 20, rule 1, CPC.



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