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Report No. 10

Part III

Tabular Statement

Central Act

State Acts

I.- Power to Requisition

The Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXX of 1952) 1. The Andhra Requisitioning of Buildings Act, 1954 (II of 1954): Section 4 enables the competent authority to to requisition any building for public purpose with the obligation on the part of the authority to pay 4 months' rent and reasonable expenses for for vacating and reoccupying as compensation, or 2 months notice instead where the building is in the occupation of a tenant or licence. The usual show cause notice with 15 days time limit to object is also provided. Requisition can in no case exceed 5 years.
Section 3(1) Where the competent authority is of opinion that any property is needed or likely to be needed for any public purpose, being a purpose of the Union and that the property should be requisitioned, the competent authority- 2. The Assam Land (Requisition and Acquisition Act, 1948 (XXIV of 1948) as amended: This seeks to provide for requisition and speedy acquisition for maintaining service essential to the community and transport irrigation, etc. Excepting land used for religious or charitable purpose and building occupied by the owner for at least one year prior to the order. Government may requisition for the purposes specified.
(a) shall call upon the owner or any other person who may be in possession of the property by notice in writing (specifying therein the purpose of the requisition) to show cause within fifteen days of the date of the service of such notice on him, why the property should not be requisitioned; and
(b) may, by order, direct that neither the owner of the property nor any other person shall, without permission of the competent authority, dispose of or structurally alter the property or let it out to a tenant until the expiry of such period, not exceeding two months, as may be specified in the order.
(2) If, after considering the cause if any, shown by any person interested in the property or in possession thereof, the competent authority is satisfied that it is necessary or expedient so to do, it may, by order in writing, requisition the property and may make such further orders as appear to it to be necessary or expedient in connection with the requisitioning: 3. The Bihar Premises Requisition (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1949 (XV of 1950) as amended: Section 3 provides or requisition of any premises for public; purpose with the usual show cause notice etc. Premises used for religious, charitable and educational purposes are exempted. The requisitioning order passed by the State Government shall be final.
Provided that no property or part thereof- 4. The Bombay Land Requisition Act, 1948 ( XXXIII of 1948) as amended: Section 5, confers the power on the State Government to requisition any land for State or public purpose. It exempts building in the actual occupation of the landlord or tenant for a period of 6 months prior to the date of order.
(a) which is bona fide used by the owner thereof as the residence of himself or his family; or
(b) which is exclusively used either for religious worship by the public or as a school, hospital, public library or an orphanage or for the purpose of accommodation of person connected with the management of such place of worship or such school, hospital, library or orphanage shall be requisitioned:
Provided further that where the requisitioned property consists of premises which are being used is a residence by a tenant for not less than two months immediately preceding the date of the service of notice under sub-section (1), the competent authority shall provide such tenant with alternative accommodation which, in its opinion, is suitable. Section 7 enables the Government to continue to keep under requisition any land requisitioned under the Continuance or Powers Act, 1947.
5. The Madhya Bharat Requisitioning of Immovable Properties Act, 1954 (XXXV of 1954): Same as Central Act.
6. The C.P. & Berar Accommodation (Requisition) Act, 1948 (LXIII of 1948): This Act enables the State Government to requisition any accommodation for providing residence to persons holding office of profit or for locating public office, etc.
7. The Madras Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1956 (XLII of 1956): Same as Central Act.
8. The Madras Essential Article Control & Requisition (Temporary Power) Act, 1949 (XXIX of 1949). Re-enacted by (VI of 1956): Section 4 enables the State Government to requisition any property for the purpose of maintaining supplies of any essential article etc. Property used for religious worship and for residential purposes has been exempted.
9. The Orissa Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXIX of 1952): Same as Central Act.
10. Pepsu Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 2006, Bk. (1 of 2006): If in its opinion it is necessary or expedient to do so the State Govt. may requisition any immovable property excepting those used for religious worship and those situated the cantonment area.
11. The Punjab Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1953 (XI of 1953) as amended: Same as Central Act.
12. The Rajasthan Requisitioning of Land (Improvement of Agriculture) Act, 1951 (XXIX of 1951): On application by the competent authority the Government after holding an inquiry and on being satisfied may requisition land for public purpose.
13. The Rajasthan Premises (Requisition and Eviction) Ordinance, 1949 (XI of 1949) as amended by Act 18 of 1952: The competent authority may requisition any premises (except those used for religious worship, school, etc) for public purpose.
14. The T.C. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Property Act, 1955 (1 of 1956): Same as Central Act.
15. The U.P. Temporary Accommodation Requisition Act, 1947 (XXV of 1947) as amended: If in his opinion it is necessary to do so the District Magistrate may requisition any accommodation excepting those used for religious worship or thier those in actual occupation of the person.
16. The V. P. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1953 (IV of 1953): Same as Central Act.
17. The West Bengal Land Requisition & Acquisition) Act, 1948 (II of 1948) as amended: For maintaining supplies essential to the life of the community or for transport etc., the State Government or any other person authorised in this behalf may requisition any land excepting those used for religious worship.
18. The W.B. Premises Requisition and Control (Temporary Provisions Act, 1947 (V of 1947) as amended: With (he exception of premises used for religious worship any premises may be requisitioned by State Government for any public purpose and such order shall be final.
19. The Waste Land (Requisitioning and Utilisation) Act, 1952 (IV of 1952) as amended: The Collector after usual show cause notice, inquiry and bearing may requisition my waste land for certain public purposes with a view to better utilisation thereof.

Continuance Acts

1. The M.P. Requisitioned Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (IX of 1951): This Act was passed to enable to keep the land requisitioned under the Defence at Lands Act, 1939 under continued requisition.
2. The West Bengal Requisitioned Land Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (VIII of 1951) as amended: This was passed for the continuance of powers exercisable under the Defence of India Act 1939 in respect of land requisitioned thereunder.

II. Power To Acquire Requisitioned Property

The Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Porperty Act, 1952 (XXX of 1962 1. 1.The Andhra Pradesh Requisitioning of Building Act, 1954, (XI of 1954): No provision for subsequent acquisition.
Section V-Where any property is subject to requisition the Central Government may, if it is of opinion that it is necessary to acquire the property for a public purpose, at any time acquire such property by publishing in the Official Gazette a notice to the effect that the Central Government has decided to acquire the property in pursuance of this Section: 2. The Assam Land Requisition Acquisition Act, 1948 (XXV of 1948): If necessary the Government may acquire the requisitioned land by notification in the Official Gazette and apply the provisions of the L. A. Act. 1894.
Provided that before issuing such notice, the Central Government shall call upon the owner of, or any other person who, in the opinion of the Central Government, may be interested in such property to show cause why the property should not be acquired; and after considering the cause, if any, shown by any person interested the property and after giving the parties an opportunity of being heard, the Central Government may pass such orders as it deems fit. 3. The Bihar Premises Requisition (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1949 (XV of 1950) as amended: No provision for subsequent acquisition.
(2) When a notice as aforesaid is published in the Official Gazette the requisitioned property shall on and from the beginning of the day on which the notice is published, vest absolutely in the Central Government free from all encumbrances and the period of requisition of such property shall end. 4. The Bombay Land Requisition Act, 1948 (XXXII! of 1948) as amended: No provision for subsequent acquisition.
(3) No property shall be acquired under this section except in the following circumstances, namely:- 5. The Madhya Bharat Requisitioning of Immovable property Act, 1954 (XXXV of 1954): No provision for subsequent acquisition.
(a) where any works have, during the period of requisition, been constructed on, in or over, the property wholly or partially at the expense of the Central Government and the Government decides that the value of, or the right to use, such works should be secured or preserved for the purposes of Government; or 6. The C.P. & Berar Accommodation (Requisition) Act, 1948 (LXIII of 1948): No provision for subsequent: acquisition.
(b) where the cost of restoring the property to its condition at the time of its requisition would, in the determination of the Central Government, be excessive and the owner declines to accept release from requisition of the property without payment of compensation for so restoring the property. 7. The Madras Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act. 1956 ( XLII of 1956): Same as Central Act.
(4) Any decision or determination of the Central Government under sub-section (3) shall be final and shall not be called in question in any court 8. The Madras Essential Article Control &, Requisition (Temporary Powers) Act, 1949 (XXIX of 1949) re-enacted by (VI of 1956): The Government may acquire requisitioned property by notification in the Official Gazette.
(5) For the purposes of clause (a) of sub­section (3) "works" includes buildings, structures and improvements of every description. 9. The Orissa Requisition and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXXIX of 1952): Same as Central Act.
10. Pepsu Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 2006 Bk. (1 of 2006): The Government may acquire requisitioned property by notification in the Official Gazette to that effect.
11. The Punjab Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act. 1953 (XI of 1953) as amended: Same as Central Act.
12. The Rajasthan Requisitioning of Land (Improvement of Agriculture) Act, 1951 XXIX of 1951): No provision for subsequent acquisition.
13. The Rajasthan Premises (Requisition and Eviction) Ordinance, 1949 (XI of 1949) as amended by the Act, 18 of 1952: No provision for subsequent acquisition.
14. The T.C. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Property Act, 1955 (1 of 1956): Same as Central Act.
15. The U.P. (Temporary Accommodation Requisition Act, 1947 (XXV of 1947) as amended: No provision for subsequent acquisition.
16. The V.P. Requisitioning and Acquisition Immovable Property Act, 1953 (IV of 1953): Same as Central Act.
17. The West Bengal Land Requisition & Acquisition) Act, 1948 (II of 1948) as amended: The requisitioned land may be acquired by notification in the Official Gazette to that effect if required for public purpose.
18. The W.B. Premises Requisition and Control (Temporary Provision) Act, 1947 (V of 1947): No provision for subsequent acquisition.
19. The Waste Land (Requisition and Utilisation) Act, 1952 (IV of 1952) as amended: No provision for subsequent acquisition.

Continuance Acts

1. The M.P. Requisitioning Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (IX of 1951): Same as Central Act.
2. The West Bengal Requisitioning Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (VIII of 1951) as amended: Same as Central Act.

III.-Compensation

The Requisitioning and Acquision of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXX of 1952) 1. The Andhra Requisitioning of Buildings, Act, 1954 (XI of 1954): In the absence of agreement, the court shall fix the fair rent which shall be the same as in sub­section (2) of section 8 of the Central Act.
Section 8. Sub-section (1).-Where any property is requisitioned or acquired under this Act, there shall be paid compensation the amount of which shall be determined in the manner and in accordance with the principles hereinafter set out, that is to say,- 2. The Assam Land (Requisition & Acquisition) Act, 1948 (XXV of 1948): as amended: The compensation amount shall be determined by the Collector according to the principles in section 23(1) of the Land Acquisition Act, 1894, the marked value being as on the date of publication of notice under section 4(1). In the absence of agreement, the compensation amount would be for the requisition and any damage done during such period and it shall not include the 15% specified in section 23(2) of the Land Acquisition Act, 1894.
(a) Where the amount of compensation can be fixed by agreement, it shall be paid in accordance with such agreement; 3. The Bihar Premises Requisition (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1949 (XV of 1950) as amended: Excepting that a District Judge shall be the arbitrator, the provisions relating to compensation are the same as those in the Central Act, 1952 relating to requisition. It is also provided that the arbitrator shall have regard to the provisions in, section 23(1) of the L.A. Act, 1894.
(b) where no such agreement can be reached, the Central Government shall appoint as arbitrator a person who is or has been, or is qualified for appointment as a Judge of a High Court; 4. The Bombay Land Requisition Act, 1948 (XXXIII of 1948) as amended: Compensation shall be determined by the officer authorised by the State Government according to the provisions of section 23(3) and 24 of the L.A. Act, 1894 in so for as they can be made applicable.
(c) the Central Government may, in any particular case, nominate a person having expert knowledge as to the nature of the property requisitioned or acquired to assist the arbitrator and where such nomination is made, the person to be compensated may also nominate an assessor for the same purpose ; 5. The M.B. Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 1954 (XXXV of 1954): Same as the Central Act, excepting for the commission of sub-section (3) of section 8 of the Central Act, since the State Act does not provide for subsequent acquisition.
(d) at the commencement of the proceedings before the arbitrator, the Central Government and the person to be compensated shall state what in their respective opinion is a fair amount of compensation; 6. The C, P. & Berar Accommodation (Requisition) Act, 1948 (LXIII of 1948): It is provided that a District Judge shall be an arbitrator and he shall have regard to provisions of section 23(1) of the L.A. Act, 1894 in so far as it can be made applicable.
(e) the arbitrator shall, after bearing the dispute make an award determining the amount of compensation which appears to him to be just and specifying the person or persons to whom such compensation shall be paid; and is making the award he shall have regard to the circumstances of each case and the provisions of sub­section (2) and (3), so far as they are applicable; Where the requisitioned accommodation is held by a tenant, the compensation payable to the tenant shall be 1 month's rent in case of month to month tenancy, 2 months' rent in case of tenancy for a fixed period not exceeding one year and 3 months' rent in case of tenancy exceeding one year.
(f) where there is any dispute as to the person or persons who are entitled to the compensation, the arbitrator shall decide such dispute and if the arbitrator finds that more persons than one are entitled to compensation, he shall apportion the amount thereof amongst such persons ; 7. In Madras Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1956 (XLII of 1956): Same as the Central Act.
(g) nothing in the Arbitration Act, 1940 (X of 1940) shall apply to arbitration under this section. 8. The Madras Essential Articles Control & Requisitioning (Temporary Powers) Act, 1949 (XXIX of 1949), re-enacted by (VI of 1956): A District Judge shall be the arbitrator and the arbitrator shall be guided by section 23(1) of L.A. Act, 1894 in so far as it can be made applicable. In case of subsequent acquisition the market value of the property shall be as on the date of requisition and not at the subsequent acquisition.
Sub-section (2).-The amount of compen­sation payable for the requisitioning of any property shall consist of-
(a) a recurring payment in respect of the period of requisition, of a sum equal to the rent which would have been payable for the use and occupation of the property, if it had been taken on lease for that period; and 9. The Orissa Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXIX of 1952). Excepting that the District Judge is an arbitrator the provisions are exactly similar to those of the Central Act.
(b) such sum or sums, if any, as may be found necessary to compensate the person interested for all or any of the following matters, namely: 10. Pepsu Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 2006 Bk. (1 of 2006); The arbitrator with qualifications to be a judge of a High Court, in making his award shall be guided by the provisions of the law relating to acquisition in force for the time being in the State in so far as it can be made applicable.
(i) pecuniary loss due to requisitioning; 11. The Punjab Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1953 (II of 1953): The provisions are exactly similar to those of Central Act of 1952. A new sub-section is added enabling the payment of compensation either in money or in kind when property is acquired in connection with the capital of the sate of Punjab.
(ii) expenses on account of vacating the requisitioned premises; 12. The Rajasthan Requisitioning of Land (Improvement of Agriculture) Act, 1951 (XXIX of 1951): The provision relating to compensation as laid down in the schedule are the same as those in sub­section (1) of section 23 and section 24 of the L.A. Act, 1894. Same provisions, regarding the increase in market value due to unlawful uses, or overcrowding of the building etc. (which are discussed in detail in the summary of the Act in Appendix V) have also been added.
(iii) expenses on account of re­occupying the premises upon release from requisition; and 13. The Rajasthan Premises (Requisition and Eviction) Ordinance, 1949 (XI of 1949) as amended by the Act (XVIII of 1952): The arbitrator who shall be a District Judge and appointed in consultation with the Chief Justice of Rajasthan shall determine the amount of compen­sation, which shall be a sum which will ensure to the landlord a return of 5% per annum on the value of the premises which shall be assessed at the actual cost of construction or the estimated cost as the case may be with any adjustment to current level of construction cost and with due regard to the age and condition of the premises at the time of requisition.
(iv) damages (other than normal wear and tear caused to the property during the period or requisition, including the expenses that may have to be incurred for restoring the property to the condition in which it was at the time of requisition. 14. The T.C. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Property Act, 1955 (1 of 1956). The provisions are the same as those in the Central Act, 1952 excepting for the omission of clause (b) of sub-section (3) of section 8.
Sub-section (3).-The compensation payable for the acquisition of any property under section 7 shall be- 15. The U.P. (Temporary Accommodation) Requisition Act, 1947 (XXV of 1947) as amended: In the absence of agreement between the District Magistrate and the owner of the accommodation, the court
(a) the price which the property would have fetched in the open market; if it had remained in the same condition as it was at the time of requisitioning and been sold on the date of acquisition, or 17. The W.B. Land (Requisition & Acquisition) Act, 1948 (II of 1948) as amended: In cases of requisition, the amount of compensation shall be in respect of requisition and any damage done during the period of requisition.
(b) twice the price which the requisitioned property would have fetched in the open market if it had been sold on the date of requisition, whichever is less. In case of acquisition, the compensation, shall be determined in accordance with the principles of section 23(1) of the L.A. Act of 1894 and it shall not include 15% specified in sub-section (2) thereof.
18. The W.B. Premises Requisition and Control (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1947 (V of 1947): Excepting that a District Judge is to be the arbitrator, the provisions are similar to those in the Central Act, 1952 in so far as it relates to requisition.
19.The Waste Land (Requisitioning and Utilisation) Act, 1952 (IV of 1952) as amended: In respect of requisition of waste land, detailed provisions relating to compensation are laid down in the Act. [See Waste Lands (Requisition and Utilisation) Act, 1952, a summary of which is given in Appendix VI.

Continuance Acts

1. The M.P. Requisitioning Land (Con­tinuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (IX of 1951): Compensation in respect of requisition shall be determined in accordance with the provision of section 19 of the Defence of India Act, 1939.
In respect of subsequent acquisition compensation payable shall be the sum sufficient to purchase at prevailing market rate as on date of riotice a piece of land equal in area to and situated within the distance of 3 miles from the acquired land and suitable for the same use or a sum equal to twice the market value of the acquired land on the date of the requisition, whichever is less.
2. The West Bengal Requisition . Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 VIII of 1951) as amended: Compensation in respect of requisition shall be determined according to the principles laid down in section 19 of the Defence of India Act, 1939.
In respect of acquisition the compensation payable shall be the amount which the requisitioned land would have fetched in the open market had it remained in the same condition as it was sold on the date of acquisition or twice the price which the requisitioned land would have fetched in open market if it had been sold on the date of requisition, whichever is less

IV. Appeal From Orders of Requisitioning

The Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXX of 1952) 1. There is no provision regarding appeals in the following Acts:-
Section 10-(1) Any person aggrieved by an order of requisition made by the competent authority under sub-section (2) of section 3 may, within twenty-one days from the date of service of the order, prefer an appeal to the Central Government: The Bombay Land Requisition Act, 1948 (XXXIII of 1948) as amended. The C.P. & Berar Accommodation (Requisition) Act, 1948 (XLIII of 1948). The Madras Essential Articles Control & Requisition (Temporary Powers) Act, 1949 (XXIX of 1949), re-enacted by (VI of 1956).
Provided that the Central Government may entertain the appeal after the expiry of the said period of twenty one days, if it is satisfied that the appellant was prevented by sufficient cause from filing the appeal in time. Pepsu Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 2006 Bk. (1 of 2006).
(2) On receipt of an appeal under sub­section (1), the Central Government may, after calling for a report from the competent authority and giving an opportunity to the parties of being heard and after making such further inquiry, if any, as may be necessary, pass such orders as it thinks fit and the order of the Central Government shall be final. The Rajasthan Requisitioning of Land (Improvement of Agriculture) Act, 1951 (XXIX of 1951).
The U.P. (Temporary Accommodation) Requisition Act, 1947 (XXV of 1947) as amended,
The W.B. Land (Requisition & Acquisition) Act, 1948 (11 of 1948) as amended.
The W.B. Premises Requisition and Control (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1947 (V of 1947).
The M.P. Requisitioned Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (IX of 1951).
The W.B. Requisitioned Land (Continuance Powers Act, 1951 (VIII of 1951) as amended.
II. Provisions similar to those of the Central Act are contained in the following Acts:-
The Madras Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1956 (XLII of 1956).
The Orissa Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXIX of 1952).
The Punjab Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1953 (XI of 1953) as amended.
The V.P. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Properly Act, 1953 (IV of 1953).
III. Miscellaneous-
The Andhra Requisitioning of Building Act, 1954 (XI of 1954): Persons aggrieved by the order may prefer an appeal to the State Government whose decision shall be final.
The Assam Land (Requisition and Acquisition) Act, 1941 (XXV of 1948) as amended: Persons aggrieved by the order may appeal to the Government whose decision shall be final.
The Bihar Premises Requisition (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1949 (XV of 1950) as amended: There is no appeal against the order of requisition passed by the State Government.
The M. B. Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 1954 (XXXV of 1954): Just as in the Central Act, an appeal lies against the order a requisition but it is to the Commissioner of the Division whose decision shall be final.
The Rajasthan Premises (Requisition & Eviction) Ordinance, 1949 (XI of 1949) amended by Act 18 of 1952: An appeal lies to the authority appointed by the Government.
The T.C. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Property Act, 1955 (1 of 1956): There is a provision empowering the Government to delegate any power conferred on them by this Act to an officer or authority subordinate to the Government. So in case the power to requisition is exercised by any officer or authority subordinate to the Government appeal shall lie from the order of requisitioning to the Government.
The Waste Lands Requisitioning and Utilisation Act, 1952 (IV of 1952) as amended: Against an order of requisitioning an appeal lies to the prescribed authority whose decision shall be final and cannot be challenged in the court of law.

V. Appeal From Awards of Compensation

The Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXX of 1952): Provisions similar to those of the Central Act are contained in the following Acts:
Section 11.-Any person aggrieved by an award of the arbitrator made under section 8 may, within thirty days from the date of such award, prefer an appeal to the High Court within whose jurisdiction the requisitioned or acquired property is situate: The M. B. Requisition of Immovable Property Act, 1954 (XXXV of 1954).
Provided that the High Court may entertain the appeal after the expiry of the said period of thirty days, if it is satisfied that the appellant was prevented by sufficient cause from filing the appeal in time. The Madras Requisitioning & Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1956 ( XLII of 1956).
The Orissa Requisitioning & Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1952 (XXIX of 1952).
The Punjab Requisitioning & Acquisition of Immovable Property Act. 1953 (XI of 1953) as amended.
The T.C. Requisitioning & Acquisition of Property Act, 1955 (I of 1956).
II. In the following Acts appeal lies to the High Court against the award:-
The Bihar Premises Requisition (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1949 (XV of 1950) as amended.
The C.P. & Berar Accommodation (Requisition) Act, 1948 (XLIII of 1948).
The Pepsu Requisitioning of Immovable Property Act, 2006 Bk. (I of 2006).
The Madras Essential Articles Control & Requisition (Temporary Powers) Act, 1949 (XXIX of 1949), re-enacted by (VI of 1956).
The W.B. Premises Requisition & Control (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1947 (V of 1947).
III. Miscellaneous-
The Andhra Requisitioning of Buildings Act, 1954 (XI of 1954): Against the decision of the District Munsif fixing the fair rent, an appeal lies to the sub-court or to the district court and such decision shall be final and not liable to review or revision.
The Assam Land (Requisition and Acquisition) Act, 1948 (XXV of 1948): When a person is aggrieved by the award, the matter shall be referred to the court and the provisions of the L. A. Act, 1894 would apply.
The Bombay Land Requisitioning Act, 1948 (XXXIII of 1948) as amended: Against the award of the officer authorised in this behalf by the Government, an appeal shall lie within 60 days to the High Court in Greater Bombay and to the District Court elsewhere except where the total amount of compensation does not exceed the amount prescribed by the Government and there shall be no further appeal.
The Rajasthan Requisitioning of Land (Impairment of Agriculture Act, 1951 (XXIX of 1951): An appeal against the decision of the officer regarding compensation lies to the District Judge. As regards compensation for damage caused to the land, the decision of the officer (subject to an appeal to the Government) shall be final.
The Rajasthan Premises (Requisition and Eviction) Ordinance, 1949 (XI of 1949) as amended by Act XVIII of 1952: There is no provision regarding appeal.
The M.P. Requisitioned Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (IX of 1952): There is no provision regarding appeal.
The W.B. Requisitioned Land (Continuance of Powers) Act, 1951 (VIII of 1951) as amended: There is no provision regarding appeal.
The U.P. (Temporary Accommodation) Requisition Act, 1947 (XXV of 1947) as amended: Compensation is to be determined by the court on a reference made to it by the District Magistrate and it is provided that no appeal or revision shall lie against such decision.
The V.P. Requisitioning and Acquisition of Immovable Property Act, 1953 (IV of 1953): An appeal against the award lies to the Judicial Commissioner.
The W.B. Land (Requisition and Acquisition) Act, 1948 (11 of 1948) as amended: It is provided that if the party is aggrieved by the award of compensation by the Collector, the matter shall be referred to the decision of the Court.
The Waste Lands (Requisitioning and Utilisation) Act, 1952 (IV of 1952) as amended: Persons aggrieved by the compensation order may appeal to the prescribed authority whose decision shall be final and cannot be challenged in a court of law.


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